Silvia Moser

Nordica Ski Ambassador Profiles: Silvia Moser

Freeride World Tour sensation and unabashed free spirit, Silvia Moser is Nordica’s youngest and Ambassador. As we quickly learned, she’s also one very determined and driven young woman.

 

 

 


 

A true child of the Dolomites, Silvia grew up in a skiing family and learned to ski as soon as she could walk. “Growing up, I was always pretty active,” she says.  “Thanks to my parents and to skiing, I’m so used to being outdoors that it’s now become essential to my wellbeing.”

Fiercely independent, Silvia says, “I never had any real heroes while growing up. I just didn’t pay any attention to what others were doing. While I admire some people for what they do, I can’t say I admire any single, one person.”

From a young age, Silvia took to skiing like a duck to water. “I love the way I feel when I have my skis on,” she says. “They give me a feeling of freedom and security that’s hard to find anywhere else. I love the way they make me live and enjoy the mountains, and where they take me on my travels.”

Silvia ski raced until age 16, when she was felled by a knee injury and the growing awareness that ski racing was perhaps just too intense. Says Silvia, “I needed space to be a person and study.”

Silvia’s studies included a brief stint to become a ski instructor. Looking back, Silvia attributes her immediate success on the Freeride World Tour to her ski racing and teaching background. Says Silvia, “being a good freeskier has a lot to do with my Alpine background. Competing in all disciplines (SL, GS, Super G and DH) gave me the ability to ski in all sorts of terrain and conditions.”

 

Silvia usually skis on Nordica Dobermann boots and Santa Ana skis. For carving, she prefers her Nordica Sentra SL7s, and she won’t Telemark without her Nordica Soulriders.

 

Silvia also extols the virtues of learning how to teach skiing. “I think I became even better when I learned to teach,” Silvia explains, “ as I was really learning how and why I was doing things with my skis.”

Clearly, Silvia learned her lessons well. In her first qualifying year for the Freeride World Tour she was named Female Freerider of the Year at the Italian Freeride Awards. The following year, she was second overall Women’s Freeride World Champion after finishing 1st at Haines, Alaska, 2nd at Verbier Extreme, 3rd at Chamonix-Mont Blanc and 5th in both Vallnord Arcalis, Andorra and Fieberbrunn, Austria. Silvia is currently ranked 11th on the FWT.

When asked how competitive freeride skiing compares with Alpine ski racing, Silvia becomes very thoughtful. “They differ in some aspects,” she says. “But in other ways they are quite similar because we’re still talking about competition, which can sometimes feel like a big show where athletes are fighting for a title. This, to me,” she adds, “hides the real nature of the sport… which is being free in the mountains.”

That being said, Silvia’s love of competitive freeride skiing far outweighs any negatives. Says Silvia, “Competitive freeride skiing has allowed me to understand where I could arrive at, and what my limitations are. It allows me to travel and to ski mountains I’ve never skied before and to meet people who share my passion.”

When asked about the difference between today’s men and women freeriders, Silvia didn’t mince her words. “If you look at the ‘show’ side of it, then yes, the men are able to do evolutions and jumps that we (girls) are just physically unable to do. But if we look at the style, I think that there are girls that are able to ski much better than (any sic) man.”

Before all our male readers start getting their knickers in a twist, you should note that the year Silvia tried out and qualified for the FWT, she was teaching skiing full-time while studying at the University of Padova. Clearly, Silvia lives up to her personal motto, which is: “Humility and hard work to deserve the life I like.”

When I asked Silvia what her all-time favourite ski destination was, she didn’t bat an eye. “You might think it’s because I live here, but the (Italian) Dolomites really are the best place to ski. Besides the very good skiing, you also have an amazing landscape.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“I’m a person with strong ideas, who loves to work and get to where I want to be.”

 

 — Silvia Moser, competitive freeride skier & Nordica Ambassador  

 

 

 

Dave Fonda
View Also
"Become a Nordican and connect with us"
Newsletter anmelden